Including: Satire; errata; propaganda; and straight-up fiction dressed as fact. Fake news is getting a lot of play right now, as people on all points of the political spectrum fight to be heard. Libraries' mandate to spread love of information literacy places us uniquely to deal with the issue, and help you do the same! But, where to start? Well, there are 4 varieties of fake news. To address them, you need to know them and be able to tell them apart.
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Fake News Variety 1: Errata | Stratford Public Library | BiblioCommons
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Errata are typically simple mistakes, but sometimes have large consequences. In most cases, retractions are issued by trusted magazines and newspapers whe...Show more Errata are typically simple mistakes, but sometimes have large consequences. In most cases, retractions are issued by trusted magazines and newspapers when they simply got something wrong. Sometimes, it's something as minor as a date in a news story, or a misspelled name. Other times, major parts of a story are misrepresented in a reporter's hurry to meet deadline. Unfortunately, a sensational wrong story will often travel farther and faster than the more boring correction ever will. The following resources will help you keep up to date with major retractions in major stories. They're also a lot of fun if you generally enjoy being pedantic, which most of us do. Show less
Fake News Variety 2: Satire | Stratford Public Library | BiblioCommons
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"Wait!" you're thinking. "What? Of course satire isn't real, that's the point!" Indeed, but sometimes it gets picked up as news by tru...Show more "Wait!" you're thinking. "What? Of course satire isn't real, that's the point!" Indeed, but sometimes it gets picked up as news by trusted news outlets. This can create some real confusion and embarrassment. Below, you'll find a selection of common satirical news sites, and some funny examples of times real news or real authorities were tricked by satire. Show less
Fake News Variety 3: Propaganda | Stratford Public Library | BiblioCommons
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Whether or not complete objectivity is possible, most reputable news sources strive for it. The truth is, reporters are only human, and their biases are l...Show more Whether or not complete objectivity is possible, most reputable news sources strive for it. The truth is, reporters are only human, and their biases are likely to come through one way or another. On a larger scale, news organizations' editorial teams and ownership have their own biases that can and do sway the content of their publications. At the far end of the spectrum are news sites and blogs that abandon the ideals of objectivity and fairness in order to promote their own agenda. On this page are a number of tools to help you discover the political bias of the news you use, so you can form your own opinion. Show less
Fake News Variety 4: Straight-Up Fiction Dressed as Fact | Stratford Public Library | BiblioCommons
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Many of us became aware of the "fake news" issue following the last presidential election in the United States. After the race, it was discovere...Show more Many of us became aware of the "fake news" issue following the last presidential election in the United States. After the race, it was discovered that young people in Macedonia were creating completely fake stories for needed cash. They were created to appeal to certain audiences on themes that were politically charged (see the first link in this list for details). These stories weren't true, but they did generate income for those running the websites, and they were shared widely on social media - leading to questions about the degree to which they influenced the election's outcome. Below, you'll find tools (developed by professionals who evaluate quality in journalism for a living) to help you discover if a site you're reading has been determined to be spreading false stories. Show less
Tools to Separate Truth from Truthiness | Stratford Public Library | BiblioCommons
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Ready to cut the garbage from your news feed? Cheers. Here are some great tools to help you get started. From fact-checking services, to sites that track ...Show more Ready to cut the garbage from your news feed? Cheers. Here are some great tools to help you get started. From fact-checking services, to sites that track changes to news stories, to simple visual aids that help you determine bias, everything you need is here. Show less
Next Steps: Make Yourself a News Ninja | Stratford Public Library | BiblioCommons
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Pride yourself on being well-informed? You are a soul after a librarian's heart. Here are some tools, courses and sites that will help you build your and BS detector into an adamantine threat to lies and disinformation everywhere. Pride yourself on being well-informed? You are a soul after a librarian's heart. Here are some tools, courses and sites that will help you build your and BS detector into an adamantine threat to lies and disinformation everywhere. Show less
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