Interesting perspective of a life that one wouldn't fully appreciate unless put in the situation of the main character. Banks obviously went through a great deal of research to be able to describe homeless life and its woes with the amount of detail that the book portrays. Great character development allowing the reader to have the ability to empathize with a character that one would usually ostracize in society. Brings about topics such as labeling, social acceptance, every day worries in homeless life, how to plan for a future as a registered sex offender and learning to trust in a world where trust is an unaffordable luxury. I enjoy the character of the Professor and his commitment to the Kid. In many ways, I understand the Kid better through the eyes of the Professor. However, his story line is shaky and confusing and nowhere near as detailed or easy to relate to as the Kid. I wonder if Banks purposely did this so that the reader would empathize with the Kid more than the Professor, playing off an idea that the criminal is the victim and the person that should be the most socially-acceptable is actually the criminal and much harder to relate to. This also speaks volumes about how all "regular people" can be one bad choice away from becoming a criminal, but people who seem like they would be the most virtuous are actually the criminals. Overall, great main themes and colourful description of a heavy topic. However, slow plot line and an ending that seemed rushed and inconclusive.

nzacchigna's rating:
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