Summertime

Summertime

Scenes From Provincial Life

Book - 2009
Average Rating:
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A young English biographer is working on a book about the late writer, John Coetzee. He plans to focus on the years from 1972–1977 when Coetzee, in his thirties, is sharing a run-down cottage in the suburbs of Cape Town with his widowed father. This, the biographer senses, is the period when he was 'finding his feet as a writer'.Never having met Coetzee, he embarks on a series of interviews with people who were important to him – a married woman with whom he had an affair, his favourite cousin Margot, a Brazilian dancer whose daughter had English lessons with him, former friends and colleagues. From their testimony emerges a portrait of the young Coetzee as an awkward, bookish individual with little talent for opening himself to others. Within the family he is regarded as an outsider, someone who tried to flee the tribe and has now returned, chastened. His insistence on doing manual work, his long hair and beard, rumours that he writes poetry evoke nothing but suspicion in the South Africa of the time.Sometimes heartbreaking, often very funny, Summertime shows us a great writer as he limbers up for his task. It completes the majestic trilogy of fictionalised memoir begun with Boyhood and Youth.
Publisher: London : Harvill Secker, 2009
ISBN: 9781846553189
1846553180
Branch Call Number: FIC Coetz 3558ad 1
Characteristics: 266 p

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s
stewstealth
Aug 31, 2014

A well crafted autobiographical novel. Definitely worth reading.

j
jthomas1527
Feb 25, 2013

This book is narrated by women and men in Coetzee's life via personal interviews, yet written by Coetzee. Coetzee is a complex character in this novel, as no one can reach his core. Is he a reliable narrator? I found myself amazed at Coetzee's ability to be introspective. At the same time, it's sad, because Coetzee is so misunderstood, yet near the end, one of his characters (who is Coetzee writing as a former lover/colleague) gives us insight into Coetzee's thinking. Incredibly humbling, and I doubt that many authors would be able to pull this off. I loved it! We all just want the author to find love and passion in someone or something.

u
uncommonreader
Jul 27, 2012

Very clever. The narrator is Coetzee's biographer using diary fragments and interviews with Coetzee's friends.

e
elinpat
Apr 25, 2012

definitely read the reviews. I enjoyed as always, but, again, not up there with Disgrace in my opinion.

m
macierules
Dec 17, 2009

Shortlisted for the Booker Prize 2009. I was a bit perturbed when I began reading to realize this is the third volume in a series...but it didn't matter in the least, that I hadn't read the first two books (Childhood, and Youth). Told from a very clever perspective - it was fascinating.

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