Lucky Girl

Lucky Girl

Book - 2009
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In a true story of family ties, journalist Mei-Ling Hopgood, one of the first wave of Asian adoptees to arrive in America, comes face to face with her past when her Chinese birth family suddenly requests a reunion after more than two decades.

In 1974, a baby girl from Taiwan arrived in America, the newly adopted child of a loving couple in Michigan. Mei-Ling Hopgood had an all-American upbringing, never really identifying with her Asian roots or harboring a desire to uncover her ancestry. She believed that she was lucky to have escaped a life that was surely one of poverty and misery, to grow up comfortable with her doting parents and brothers.

Then, when she's in her twenties, her birth family comes calling. Not the rural peasants she expected, they are a boisterous, loving, bossy, complicated middle-class family who hound her daily--by phone, fax, and letter, in a language she doesn't understand--until she returns to Taiwan to meet them. As her sisters and parents pull her into their lives, claiming her as one of their own, the devastating secrets that still haunt this family begin to emerge. Spanning cultures and continents, Lucky Girl brings home a tale of joy and regret, hilarity, deep sadness, and great discovery as the author untangles the unlikely strands that formed her destiny.

Publisher: Chapel Hill, N.C. : Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 2009
Edition: 1st ed. --
ISBN: 9781565126008
1565126009
Branch Call Number: 362.734092 Hopgo 3558ad 1
Characteristics: 244 p

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m
mseverson54
Jan 27, 2016

Great read! Memorable characters.

r
ryner
Jun 23, 2009

Mei-Ling Hopgood always knew she had been adopted -- hard to miss since she was Chinese and her Michigan parents Caucasian! During her happy childhood she never wondered much about her biological family. After graduating from college and becoming a journalist, a chance encounter with the nun who hand-delivered her from China into the arms of her adoptive parents opens a door into her past. Mei-Ling then has to ask herself whether she wants to learn about her biological family, whether she wants to meet them, and how close she's willing to get to the family she's never known and who gave her away.

While reading Mei-Ling's story, I appreciated her background in writing. A memoir relating someone's interesting story is so much more enjoyable when well-written. I questioned her seemingly rapid plunge into the arms of her Chinese family, in that I think if it were me I'd have been a mite more cautious initially.

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